Pens for people with arthritis

Therapeutic writing has been used to ease the symptoms of a wide variety of illnesses and conditions, one of which is rheumatoid arthritis. The psychological benefits of putting one’s thoughts onto paper are a task that should be recommended for anyone, especially those who may now be less physically active.

Though writing can be a difficult task for someone who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, improved writing ergonomics greatly reduces writing strain while giving a more stable, comfortable grip. It’s generally accepted that a pen with a wider grip allows for less downward pressure and eliminates squeezing which in turn makes writing less straining.  One can find a large assortment of pens with a wide rubber grip, which one could say are an ergonomic improvement to a classic narrow pen. However, these pens were designed to ease finger strain caused by note taking, such as in the case of students, and fall short of the demands of people with arthritis.

The Yoropen is regarded as one of the most ergonomic pens on the market. The Yoropen is regarded as one of the most ergonomic pens on the market.

The Yoropen is an ergonomic pen with a tripod grip which we feel is ideally suited for people who suffer the effects of arthritis. Other than being very comfortable, the 45 degree angle of the nib allows the pen to rest softly between an extended forefinger and thumb, resultantly improving pen posture. This revolutionary design almost eliminates the need to press pen to paper which reduces writing strain and saves energy.  A rubber casing covers the tripod grip which gives the pen a bulbous body and prevents fingers from slipping. To accommodate differing needs, Yoropens can be held in a variety of ways and the grip can be fine-tuned by holding the nib and turning the pen body.

Yoropens can be held in a variety of ways Yoropens can be held in a variety of ways

Even when inspiration takes hold and causes the words to flow uncontrollably like water, it’s important to remember to take short breaks. Experts recommend that those suffering from the effects of arthritis should release their grip every 10 - 15 minutes or whenever fatigue begins to set in.

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